Historical Sketches of Wilkes

$15.00

Originally published in 1902 by John Crouch and re-published by the Wilkes Genealogical Society, Inc. Summary: The Wilkes Genealogical Society has added an index to this version of the book. The Index is below. Historical Sketches of Wilkes County, is a compilation of older stories yet, with content compiled and collected by Newspaperman John Crouch…

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Originally published in 1902 by John Crouch and re-published by the Wilkes Genealogical Society, Inc.

Summary:

The Wilkes Genealogical Society has added an index to this version of the book. The Index is below.

Historical Sketches of Wilkes County, is a compilation of older stories yet, with content compiled and collected by Newspaperman John Crouch that illuminates the history of Wilkes County, North Carolina, from 1750 to the early days of the 20th century.

In large part, the early history of Wilkes County is the history of western North Carolina, and to some extent, the history of America. During the American Revolution, the western borders of Wilkes County extended to the Mississippi River, encompassing all of western North Carolina and Tennessee. The failed state of Franklin existed briefly within the borders of Wilkes County.

From the Moravian survey in 1752, to the Battle of Kings Mountain, to the fall of Fort Hamby at the end of the Civil War, over one hundred and fifty years of local history is here to be experienced from the perspective of those who lived it.

 

Excerpt from Historical Sketches of Wilkes County, N. C:

Between the years of 1855 and 1860, in Wilkesboro, occurred one of the most remarkable fights in the history of the county. Robinson’s Show had pitched their tents in the vale on the north side of Main Street opposite the place where the new Methodist church now stands. The show people had a stand where they sold candy, lemonade, etc. It was at this stand that the trouble arose. George Johnson went up to the stand to buy some candy; the showman wanted to charge him about three times the usual price in the stores at that time, when finally Johnson told him to take the candy and go to h–1 with it. This insulted the showman who in turn insulted Johnson, who was something of a fighter, and he at once began the fight. The showman’s partner came to his aid, armed with sticks, single trees and such other weapons as they could get their hands on. Johnson’s friends came to his aid about as fast as the showmen to the aid of their comrade. A desperate battle followed.

Among Johnson’s friends who engaged in the fight may be mentioned the following: Ellis Anderson, Andy Porter, “Bill” Transou, Wesley Nicholls, Peter Johnson, Jones Transou, and others.

Such weapons were used as were most convenient and several on each side were badly hurt, but no one killed.

 

88 pages

* This text has been digitally restored and enhanced from a first or second-generation edition. Some aesthetic errors may persist; however, it has been deemed that any such errors will not detract from the work’s readability.

All profit goes to the Wilkes Genealogical Society, a  501(c)(3) non profit organization, which allows us to fulfill our mission of providing, education, research, and publications related to Wilkes Genealogy.

Index of Names